How do I get Enough Protein? What Foods Should I be Eating


You have probably been told numerous times that vegan foods just plain and simply don't contain any protein whatsoever.

Have you also been told that you must consume animal protein sources to be strong, healthy and thriving?

Fun fact... its all a lie. There is protein in just about everything! Every food source is made up of all the macronutrients, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Even a simple bread roll has roughly 11 grams of protein in it. Oh and if you're spreading peanut butter on the roll then you're getting even more protein. Yep. If you don't believe me then you are clearly living in denial.  You would have to eat a very random and obscure diet filled with lollies and processed junk to have a protein deficiency.

Vegetables, beans, legumes and lentil have copious amounts of protein in them. They are also incredibly superior to animal based protein sources because they don't come with any of the negative side effects that animal proteins contain.  The negatives like the saturated fats, cholesterol, antibiotics, hormones, faeces, and bad karma. Plants on the other hand are loaded with antioxidants, phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals, other nutrients, good vibes, and lots of delicious flavour. Going vegan can actually lower your risk of developing cancer and diseases caused by a meat based diet. 

The follow list of protein quantities in food are found from PETA. They are all accurate and verified. 

Vegetables, Bean, and Lentils: 

Artichokes – 8 grams of protein per cup: Great source of vitamin C, fibre, potassium, and magnesium

Asparagus – 4.5 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of B vitamins and folate

Avocado – 4 grams of protein per cup: Loaded with vitamins C, E, K, and B6 as well as riboflavin, niacin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, and potassium

Black Beans – 15 grams of protein per cup: Great source of antioxidants, fibre, folate, copper, manganese, thiamine, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron

Broccoli – 4 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of calcium, vitamin C, fibre, and B vitamins

Chickpeas – 15 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of fibre, iron, folate, phosphorus, potassium, and manganese

Edamame – 20 grams per cup: Great source of vitamin K1, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, iron, copper, and manganese

Green Peas – 9 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, and several B vitamins as well as fibre, folate, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and K

Kidney Beans – 13 grams of protein per cup: Great source of calcium, vitamin C, fibre, and B vitamins

Lentils – 18 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of fibre, thiamine, folate, manganese, and vitamins A, C, and K

Pinto Beans – 12 grams of protein per cup: Great source of molybdenum, folate, fibre, copper, manganese, phosphorus, vitamins B12 and B6, magnesium, potassium, and iron

Spinach – 5 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of vitamins A, C, E, K, and B6 as well as niacin, zinc, fibre, thiamine, folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, and manganese

Nuts and Seeds:

100 Per Cent Whole Wheat Pasta – 8 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of B vitamins and iron

Almonds – 21 grams of protein per 100 grams: Great source of vitamin E, manganese, biotin, copper, magnesium, molybdenum, riboflavin, and phosphorus

Amaranth – 7 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of iron, B vitamins, and magnesium

Buckwheat – 24 grams of protein per cup: Great source of antioxidants, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, niacin, zinc, iron, folate, and vitamin B6

Chia Seeds – 5 grams of protein per 2 tablespoons: Great source of calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, boron, niacin, and vitamins B, D, and E, and contains 8.7 times the omega-3 fatty acids found in wild Atlantic salmon

Ezekiel Bread – 8 grams of protein per two slices: Great source of fibre, folate, beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E

Hemp Seeds – 15.5 grams of protein per half cup: Great source of magnesium, iron, calcium, zinc, selenium, and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids

Millet – 6 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of niacin, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, potassium, calcium, zinc, and phytochemicals

Peanut Butter – 7 grams of protein per two tablespoons: Great source of magnesium, potassium, and vitamins B6 and E

Pistachios – 21 grams of protein per 100 grams: Great source of copper, manganese, thiamine, phosphorus, and vitamin B6

Pumpkin Seeds – 6 grams of protein per half cup: Great source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc

Quinoa – 8 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of fibre, iron, manganese, phosphorus, and magnesium

Sunflower Seeds – 6 grams of protein per quarter cup: Great source of manganese, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, folate, niacin, thiamine, and vitamins E and B6

Wild Rice – 7 grams of protein per cooked cup: Great source of fibre, manganese, magnesium, copper, phosphorus, and B vitamins as well as an excellent source of iron, folate, and potassium

Soy, Vegan Meats:

Nutritional Yeast – 9 grams of protein per two tablespoons (5.7 grams in parmesan cheese): Good source of fibre, zinc, magnesium, copper, manganese, and all the B vitamins, including B12

Seitan – 25 grams of protein per 100 grams (25 grams of protein in a steak): Great source of selenium

Soy Milk – 8 grams of protein per cup (8 grams in cows’ milk): Great source of potassium, isoflavones, and vitamins A and B12, and often fortified with calcium and vitamin D

Tempeh – 41 grams of protein per cup (20 grams in a chicken breast): Great source of probiotics, B vitamins, and minerals such as magnesium and phosphorus

Tofu – 20 grams of protein per cup (12 grams in two hard-boiled eggs): Great source of calcium, manganese, copper, selenium, phosphorus, omega-3 fatty acids, iron, magnesium, zinc, and thiamine

Be sure to be consuming lots of these foods everyday! Especially copious amounts of vegetables. Let go of the old school 5 a day rule and start focusing on filling your plate with vegetables before you load it with other things. I start with a good vegetable based and build my meal from there. I will always add a legume (bean or lentil) source to my meal as well as nuts and seeds and a portion or two of a soy product. 

Eating this way will ensure you're receiving adequate protein, carbohydrates and fats as well as an abundance of nourishing micronutrients.